Skip to main content

QPS

  • Meeting directives, such as ELV REACh and RoHS continues to be essential requirements. QPS delivers on all of these needs. QPS complies with the conditions set forth in the ISO 9001: 2015.

     

    QPS helps automotive engineers to specify the right products in a sustainable world. The steady evolution of the program has enabled many global OEM’s to specify ever-higher performance standards and represents:

    • Approved applicators: Applying these products to a common audited standard ensures the same coating performance throughout the applicator base.
    • High performance: Exceeding the high demands for corrosion resistance and exceptionally consistent torque and tension characteristics.
    • Global consistency: Wherever ZinKlad, DecoKlad or XMAPP standards are applied, applicators know they are using the same high-performance products.

    What do we do?

    Image
    QPS flow chart

    We supply and develop QPS standards that meet and exceed OEM specifications. We validate applicators processes by conducting audits, carrying out inspections and testing the production output to make sure they meet pre-defined QPS standards and agreed technical requirements.

    We monitor and report results on a global scale to be able to service and continuously improve performance. 

    Why do we do what we do?

    We believe that we are able to assure a global consistent performance at a local level meeting the global OEM requirements with a select number of world class applicators.

    How do we do what we do?

    ESI Automotive has developed a unique Quality Performance System called QPS that tackles the challenges for high-performance automotive coatings. OEM’s can be confident that the same coatings and consistent performance are available worldwide.

Image
Inverter in hand

Press Release

Oct 7, 2021

Systems-level thinking key to lowering costs of EVs, says ESI Automotive

[Waterbury, USA, October 4, 2021] A systems-level approach to electric vehicle (EV) development is essential to calculating potential gains in vehicle efficiency and build costs required to bring the total cost of the EV powertrain down. That’s the message from ESI Automotive at a time when the US is pushing for half of new cars sold in the country to be battery-powered by the end of the decade.

The Biden administration recently stated its intent to invest billions of dollars into charging stations for EVs and introduce point-of-sale rebates for consumers purchasing EVs to alleviate cost pressures. Automakers have backed the move, committing to end internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicle production and kickstart EV manufacturing. However, the country remains in a precarious state: three percent of new cars sold in the United States in the first half of 2021 were electric[1] - a far lower rate than China and Europe - which offer more generous incentives and have stricter auto-regulations.

A major barrier to EV adoption in the States is the cost of EVs. At the high end of the EV market, a Tesla Model S starts at more than $80,000, and at the low end, a Chevrolet Bolt starts at $31,000 — nearly $10,000 more than a larger gasoline-powered sedan like the Chevy Malibu. Reaching price parity with ICE cars is key to ensuring greater adoption of EVs.

Chris Klok, director of vehicle electrification at ESI Automotive believes that it is possible for OEMs to make both cost savings and vehicle efficiency improvements by viewing the entire design and production process at a systems-level.

“By viewing vehicle manufacturing at a systems-level, it is possible to understand where significant savings can be made, which can contribute to lowering the overall resale price of EVs, making them more competitive.

Chris Klok
Director – Vehicle Electrification Technology

“For example, silver sintering technology delivers proven benefits to the inverter in terms of increasing overall vehicle range and performance by boosting thermal and electrical conductivity. As part of the powertrain system, sintering contributes to a decrease in bottom line expenditure.

“Furthermore, sintering has been proven to improve power-density to the inverter, increasing range and eliminating the need – and cost – of additional battery content.”

According to Klok, key to automakers being able to identify these efficiency and cost improvements is a more collaborative approach to working with the vehicle supply chain. The formation of technology partnerships can enable OEMs to improve powertrain efficiencies with the assistance, experience and support of more established technology partners.

 

[1]Electric vehicle sales surge in 2021 (power-technology.com)